FAQs

FAQs

Lupus is a widespread, chronic autoimmune disease that, for unknown reasons, causes the immune system to attack the body’s own connective tissues and organs. These can include joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood, muscles and skin.

There are an estimated 350,000 people in Europe with lupus. More than five million people are affected worldwide.

Nine out of ten of those affected are women.

80% of the newly diagnosed are between the ages of 15 and 45.

Certain ethnicities are more likely to develop lupus than others.

No-one knows the true causes of lupus. However genetic and environmental factors play a role. For example, some known triggers are photosensitivity, smoking, cardio-vascular diseases, etc.

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, rashes, hair loss (alopecia), swollen glands, sensitivity to light (photosensitivity), joint pain, pericarditis, pleurisy, kidney disease, cognitive problems and others.

No two cases of lupus are the same. Symptoms and severity differ from person to person and even from day to day.

There is no cure for lupus. Typical treatments include fast-acting steroids (like Prednisolone), which are usually used for the shortest possible period or at the lowest possible dose, together with maintenance medication which acts longer-term, such as anti-malarials, to which immunosuppressants can be added when needed. In June 2012, Belimumab became the first EMA-approved lupus drug treatment in over 50 years. With good management and adherence to medication, lupus can be well controlled for the majority of people.

If left untreated, lupus is potentially fatal. Lupus can lead to organ damage and failure. Serious conditions that can arise include kidney disease, pancreatitis, pleurisy, vasculitis, pericarditis, and cancer.

Lupus is one of Europe’s less known chronic, serious diseases. While lupus is rare in some European countries, it is less so in others. Awareness and accurate knowledge about it lags decades behind many other illnesses.

Being a knowledgeable partner in the doctor-patient relationship will help you to self-manage your lupus better and have a better quality of life.

Living a full life with lupus is possible for some, but doing so relies heavily on early diagnosis and consistent treatment.

Studies have produced estimates, that approximately 1 – 8 people per 100,000 are diagnosed with lupus each year.

There are many treatments for lupus’ symptoms, but there is no cure… at least not yet!

Lupus is a widespread, chronic autoimmune disease that, for unknown reasons, causes the immune system to attack the body’s own connective tissues and organs. These can include joints, kidneys, heart, lungs, brain, blood, muscles and skin.

There are an estimated 500,000 people in Europe with lupus (EULAR). More than five million people are affected worldwide.

Nine out of ten of those affected are women.

80% of the newly diagnosed are between the ages of 15 and 45.

Certain ethnicities are more likely to develop lupus than others.

No-one knows the true causes of lupus. However genetic and environmental factors play a role. For example, some known triggers are photosensitivity, smoking, cardio-vascular diseases, etc.

Symptoms include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, rashes, hair loss (alopecia), swollen glands, sensitivity to light (photosensitivity), joint pain, pericarditis, pleurisy, kidney disease, cognitive problems and others.

No two cases of lupus are the same. Symptoms and severity differ from person to person and even from day to day.

There is no cure for lupus. Typical treatments include fast-acting steroids (like Prednisolone), which are usually used for the shortest possible period or at the lowest possible dose, together with maintenance medication which acts longer-term, such as anti-malarials, to which immunosuppressants can be added when needed. In June 2012, Benlysta became the first EMA-approved lupus drug treatment in over 50 years. With good management and adherence to medication, lupus can be well controlled for the majority of people.

If left untreated, lupus is potentially fatal. Lupus can lead to organ damage and failure. Serious conditions that can arise include kidney disease, pancreatitis, pleurisy, vasculitis, pericarditis, and cancer.

Lupus is one of Europe’s less known chronic, serious diseases. While lupus is rare in some European countries, it is less so in others. Awareness and accurate knowledge about it lags decades behind many other illnesses.

Being a knowledgeable partner in the doctor-patient relationship will help you to self-manage your lupus better and have a better quality of life.

Living a full life with lupus is possible for some, but doing so relies heavily on early diagnosis and consistent treatment.

Studies have produced estimates, that approximately 1 – 8 people per 100,000 are diagnosed with lupus each year.

There are many treatments for lupus’ symptoms, but there is no cure… at least not yet!